How to use search engine dorks with Google.

How to use Search Engine Dorks?

Search engine dorks are advanced search terms that can be crafted in a way that allows you to perform reconnaissance on a wide range of publicly available information on the web. Essentially, dorks are search queries formatted in a way that can find hidden and misconfigured data from websites. Common examples of these include: XSS, SQLi, PII, customer data, transaction information, etc.

The Google Hacking Database (GHDB) is a compiled list of common mistakes web/server admins make, which can be easily searched by using Google. As a result, you can find things like administrator consoles, password files, credit card numbers, unprotected webcams, etc. https://www.exploit-db.com/google-hacking-database

Google Search Basics

Google being a full-text search engine, it indexes entire web pages instead of just titles and
descriptions. This allows comprehensive searches based upon key (query) words. Straight from the Google search page.

OperatorExampleDescription
site:site:nvidia.comallows you to narrow your search by either a site or a top-level domain.
AND (Default)facebook Nvidia “Golden State”Google’s Boolean default is AND; that means if you enter query words without modifiers, Google
will search for all of them.
ORfacebook OR Nvidia OR “Golden State”If you want to specify that either word is acceptable, you put
an OR between each item.
Parenthesesfacebook (Nvidia OR “Golden State”)If you want to definitely have one term and have one of two or more other terms, you group them
with parentheses.
Pipe (|) facebook (Nvidia | “Golden State”)A stand-in for OR borrowed from the computer programming realm is the | (pipe)
character.
Minus (-)facebook Nvidia -“Golden State”If you want to specify that a query item must not appear in your results, use a – (minus sign or
dash).
intitle:intitle:NvidiaRestricts your search to the titles of web pages.
allintitle:allintitle:Nvidia FacebookIf you have a query where you are using the intitle: dork in one search query, you can shorted the query by using the allintitle: operator
inurl:breached inurl:nvidiaReturns search results with your search term specifically in the URL such as the domain name or in any path or file of the domain.
allinurl:breached allinurl:nvidia ransomReturns search results with all of your search terms specifically in the URL such as the domain name or in any path or file of the domain.
intext:intext:”Nvidia breach”Searches only body text (i.e., ignores link text, URLs, and titles).
inanchor:inanchor:”nvidia security”Searches for text in a page’s link anchors.
link:link:nvidia developerReturns a list of pages linking to the specified URL.
cache:cache:hackthebox.comFinds a copy of the page that Google indexed even if that page is no longer
available at its original URL or has since changed its content completely.
filetype:filetype:xls inurl:confidentialSearches the suffixes or filename extensions. These are usually, but not
necessarily, different file types.
daterange:site:google.com daterange:2452463.5Limits your search to a particular date or range of dates that a page was
indexed. The query is based on the Julian date.

site: Operator

site: allows you to narrow your search by either a site or a top-level domain.

site:nvidia.com
site: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

AND (Default) Dork

Google’s Boolean default is AND; that means if you enter query words without modifiers, Google
will search for all of them.
If you search for:
facebook Nvidia “Golden State”
Google will search for all the words.

AND Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

OR Dork

If you want to specify that either word is acceptable, you put
an OR between each item:

facebook OR Nvidia OR "Golden State"
OR Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

Parentheses Google Dork

If you want to definitely have one term and have one of two or more other terms, you group them
with parentheses, like this:

facebook (Nvidia OR "Golden State")

This query searches for the word “Nvidia” or phrase “Golden State” along with the word
“facebook”

Parentheses Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

Pipe (|) Google Dork

A stand-in for OR borrowed from the computer programming realm is the | (pipe)
character, as in:

facebook (Nvidia | "Golden State")
Pipe Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

Minus (-) Google Dork

If you want to specify that a query item must not appear in your results, use a – (minus sign or
dash).

facebook Nvidia -"Golden State"

This will search for pages that contain both the words “facebook” and “Nvidia,” but not
the phrase “Golden State”

Minus Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

intitle: Operator

intitle: restricts your search to the titles of web pages.

intitle:Nvidia
intitle: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

allintitle: Operator

allintitle: if you have a query where you are using the intitle: dork in one search query, you can shorted the query by using the allintitle: operator

allintitle:Nvidia Facebook
allintitle: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

inurl: Operator

inurl: returns search results with your search term specifically in the URL such as the domain name or in any path or file of the domain.

breached inurl:nvidia
inurl: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

allinurl: Operator

allinurl: returns search results with all of your search terms specifically in the URL such as the domain name or in any path or file of the domain.

breached allinurl:nvidia ransom
allinurl: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

intext: Operator

intext: searches only body text (i.e., ignores link text, URLs, and titles).

intext:"Nvidia breach"
intext: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

inanchor: Operator

inanchor: searches for text in a page’s link anchors. A link anchor is the descriptive text of a link. For example, the link anchor in the HTML code:

<a
 href="http://www.nvidia.com>Nvidia Security</a>

is “Nvidia Security”

inanchor:"nvidia security"
inanchor: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

link: Operator

link: returns a list of pages linking to the specified URL.

link:nvidia developer
link: Google Dork Example. Learn cyber security.

cache: Operator

cache: finds a copy of the page that Google indexed even if that page is no longer
available at its original URL or has since changed its content completely. This is
particularly useful for pages that change often. If Google returns a result that appears to have little to do with your query, you’re almost sure to find what you’re looking for in the latest cached version of the page at Google

cache:hackthebox.com

filetype: Operator

filetype: searches the suffixes or filename extensions. These are usually, but not
necessarily, different file types.

filetype:xls inurl:confidential

daterange: Operator

daterange: limits your search to a particular date or range of dates that a page was
indexed. The query is based on the Julian date, a continuous count of days since noon UTC on January 1, 4713 BC. Therefore, the date entered must be converted to a Julian date. So, for example, July 8, 2002 is Julian date 2452463.5

site:google.com daterange:2452463.5

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